November Staff Picks

Staff-recommended reading from the Alexandria Library Catalog. Check back each month for a new list. Need some recommended titles? Tell us five titles you have enjoyed and we'll send you a list of five more that we think you will like. Also check out our new Goodreads Group for reviews, online bookclubs, and more!

 

 

The boy in the snow

By M. J. McGrath

HHalf-Inuit Edie Kiglatuk finds herself in Alaska with Sergeant Derek Palliser, helping her ex-husband Sammy in his bid to win the famous Iditarod dog sled race. The race takes a grim turn when Edie stumbles upon the body of a baby left out in the forest. The state troopers are keen to pin the death on the Dark Believers--a sinister offshoot of a Russian Orthodox sect--but Edie's instincts tell her otherwise. Her investigations take her into a world of corrupt politics, religious intolerance, greed, and sex trafficking.

 

  

Love medicine

By Louise Erdrich

The lives and destinies of the Kashpaws and the Lamartines intertwine on and around a North Dakota Indian reservation from 1934 to 1984, in an authentic tale of survival, tenacity, tradition, injustice, and love.

 


  

The absolutely true diary of a part-time Indian

 By Sherman Alexie

Budding cartoonist Junior leaves his troubled school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white farm town school where the only other Indian is the school mascot.

 

 

  

  

Killers of the Flower Moon : the Osage murders and the birth of the FBI

By David Grann

In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. 

 

 

 

  

Sing down the moon

By Scott O'Dell

The Spanish slavers came first, later the soldiers forced the Navajos of the Canyon to join their Indian brothers on the devastation long march to Fort Sumner; through the eyes of Bright Morning, a young Navajo girl, we see what can happen to human beings when they are uprooted from the life they know.

 

 

 

 

  

The Lone Ranger and Tonto fistfight in heaven

By Sherman Alexie

In this darkly comic short story collection, Sherman Alexie, a Spokane/Coeur d'Alene Indian, brilliantly weaves memory, fantasy, and stark realism to paint a complex, grimly ironic portrait of life in and around the Spokane Indian Reservation.

 

 

 

  

 

The bean trees: a novel

By Barbara Kingsolver

Meet Taylor Greer. Clear eyed and spirited she grew up poor in rural Kentucky with two goals: to avoid pregnancy and to get away. She succeeds on both counts when she buys a 55 Volkswagen and heads west. But by the time our plucky if unlikely heroine pulls up on the outskirts of Tucson, Arizona at an auto repair shop called Jesus is Lord Used tires that also happens to be a sanctuary for Central American refugees, she's inherited a three year old American Indian girl named Turtle.

 

 

  

Bury my heart at Wounded Knee : an Indian history of the American West

By Dee Brown

In this nonfiction account, Dee Brown focuses on the betrayals, battles, and massacres suffered by American Indians between 1860 and 1890. He tells of the many tribes and their renowned chiefs -from Geronimo to Red Cloud, Sitting Bull to Crazy Horse-who struggled to combat the destruction of their people and culture.

 

 

 

  

Saltypie : a Choctaw journey from darkness into light

 By Tim Tingle

Stories of the author's Choctaw Indian family, centering particularly on his blind grandmother.

 

 

   

The orenda

 By Joseph Boyden

A Huron warrior and elder named Bird soon takes him prisoner, along with a young Iroquois girl, Snow Falls, whose family he has just killed, and holds them captive in his massive village. Champlain's Iron People have only recently begun trading with the Huron, who mistrust them as well as this Crow who has now trespassed onto their land; and her people, of course, have become the Huron's greatest enemy.