Photographs from Alexandria Library Special Collections

Green Family Furniture Ad

Green Family Furniture Ad


Green Diary May 24, 1861

Green Diary May 24, 1861

 

Mansion House Hospital

Mansion House Hospital


Mansion House Hospital

Mansion House Hospital

 

Convalescent Camp Cooks

Convalescent Camp Cooks


Coal Wharf

Coal Wharf


Soldiers Rest

Soldiers Rest

Mercy Street at Alexandria Library

"Mercy Street” – inspired by real events of Civil War Alexandria – is PBS’s first American drama in nearly a decade. The six-episode series takes viewers into the lives of Alexandrians during the Civil War. The Alexandria Library’s Special Collections played an integral role in providing research and information to promote historical accuracy in the series.

Join us from January 9 through February 27 as the Library celebrates PBS's recognition of Alexandria's place in history with a variety of programs that will provide insight regarding life in Alexandria during the Civil War.

Premiering on Sunday, January 17, 2016, at 10 p.m., Mercy Street will follow the final season of “Downton Abbey” on Masterpiece.


The Real Greens: Emma and the Green Family of Alexandria

Saturday, 1/9 - 1:30pm - Special Collections (717 Queen St.)
Join us for a talk by Dr. Donald DeBats, “The Real Greens: Emma and the Green Family of Alexandria.” Find out about the actual Emma and her family. Dr. DeBats is the Head of American Studies at Flinders University in Adelaide, Australia. He is Chair of the Board of Directors of the Australian-American Fulbright Commission and Director (US), Centre for United States and Asia Policy Studies (CUSAPS).

 

Take a Turn Down Mercy Street: The History Behind the Scenes

Sunday, 1/10 - 1:00pm - Athenaeum (201 Prince St.) - Program is full
Join us for a free lecture featuring George K. Combs, Alexandria Library's Special Collections Branch Manager, Callie Stapp, Curator at the Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum and local author Michael Pope to hear about the real people, places and events featured in the show. 

 

Civil War Medicine with Dr. Guy Hasegawa

Saturday, 1/16 - 1:30pm - Beatley Central (5005 Duke St.)
Dr. Guy Hasegawa, a noted Civil War medicine scholar, will give a talk on "Medicinal Alcohol in the Civil War." He is well-published and has written about such diverse Civil War topics as pharmacies, medical purveying, medical cadets, and artificial limbs. His most recent work, Villainous Compounds: Chemical Weapons and the American Civil War, was released in the autumn of 2015. Dr. Hasegawa has been on the board of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine since 2004. Located in the Large Meeting Room.

 

Tea Traditions Beyond Downton Abbey

Sunday, 1/17 - 2:00pm - Beatley Central (5005 Duke St.)
Laurie Bell, certified tea specialist, will share how other parts of the world celebrate and enjoy tea. Registration required. Call 703-746-1751. Space is limited. Located in the Large Meeting Room.

 

Talking Mercy

Tuesday, 1/26 - 7:00pm - Special Collections (717 Queen St.) 
Join George K. Combs, Special Collections Manager, as we discuss the show - up to this point - and a look at the "real" Alexandria. Come and meet other fans of the show and compare notes and ideas.

 

Northern Virginia Women in the Civil War

Saturday, 1/30 - 2:00pm - Burke Branch (4701 Seminary Rd.)
Beginning with the arrival of Union troops in April 1861, northern Virginia women faced many new realities during the Civil War. Some chose to flee, while others remained to cope with occupation. New opportunities also opened for women who worked in local hospitals and for other women who served as spies. After fleeing slavery, African American women found themselves in crowded contraband camps, often working for wages. By the time the Civil War ended, women's lives in Virginia had changed forever. Presented by Professor Alice Reagan from Northern Virginia Community College.

 

Walt Whitman in Alexandria

Saturday, 1/30 - 2:00pm - Duncan Branch (2501 Commonwealth Ave.)
Join Garrett Peck, local historian, for a lecture on Walt Whitman in Alexandria. Peck has researched Whitman’s time in the hospitals of Washington, D.C. and his visits to Alexandria. This crucial, formative time in Walt Whitman’s life is explored by a local historian with a great interest and knowledge of the poet’s time in our city. Garrett Peck is the author of numerous books including his latest work, Walt Whitman in Washington, D.C.: The Civil War and America’s Greatest Poet.

 

Battlefield Medicine: Trauma Care in the Civil War

Saturday, 2/6 - 12pm - 1:30pm - Barrett Branch (717 Queen St.) New time
Civil War soldiers suffered devastating casualties. Have you ever wondered who took care of them? This program explains and demonstrates medical practices of the time. Learn about Civil War ammunition and the types of wounds it caused. The speaker will also talk about casualties, how they were evacuated from their location, and where they were treated. Jake Wynn of the The National Museum of Civil War Medicine will present. For more information call (703)746-1721.

 

The Green Family of Cabinetmakers: An Alexandria Institution

Saturday, 2/6 - 1:30pm - Special Collections (717 Queen St.)
How did the Greens make their money and became a prominent Alexandria family? Join Dr. Oscar Fitzgerald for a look at the family business. Dr. Fitzgerald teaches classes about antique furniture at the Smithsonian Institution/George Mason University Master's Program in the History of Decorative Arts. His publications include an exhibit catalogue, Green Family of Cabinetmakers: An Alexandria Institution and Four Centuries of American Furniture the standard textbook in the field.

 

Talking Mercy

Tuesday, 2/16 - 7:00pm - Special Collections (717 Queen St.)-Program is canceled.
Join other "Mercy Street" fans for an hour of fun facts and discussion about the show, Alexandria, and the Civil War. How will the series end? What plot twists would you like to see next season?

 

Make Your Own Tintype Box - Crafts From the Civil War Era

Saturday, 2/20 - 11am - Barrett Branch (717 Queen St.)
Join local artist and teacher Laura Hummel as she demonstrates how to make a tintype-like box using Altoid tins. Supplies will be provided; for ages 12 and up.

 

Dr. Jonathan Letterman : Father of Modern Emergency Medicine

Saturday, 2/27 - 1:00pm - Barrett Branch (717 Queen St.)
Jonathan Letterman, medical director of the Army of the Potomac, revolutionized the treatment of sick and wounded soldiers in the field and introduced the first comprehensive system of staged evacuation and treatment, the basis of modern emergency and combat medicine. Though few Americans know his name, Dr. Letterman is one of the most important men in the history of American medicine. This talk examines the man, his career, Civil War experiences, and legacy in the last 150 years. Come to this free lecture presented by Greg Susla, a pharmacist who interprets at the Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick, MD. 


Check out other Mercy Street events around town at http://www.visitalexandriava.com/mercystreet/.